Nine to Five

As I work with our growing list of BGW Sustainable Solutions clients, I’ve been thinking a lot about the relationship between ministry and work. Why are these two so often kept completely separate?

I recently came across a series of articles created by the Theology of Work project regarding how to equip people for God’s work in the world. Below are a few examples they have seen:

Prayer For Workers: One church prays for a different group of workers each month. They have gone right through their church list with the aim to include everybody in special prayer for their daily work at least once a year.

This Time Tomorrow: The Imagine Church Project in London encourages churches to invite a different person each week to answer three questions about This Time Tomorrow (TTT) in their worship services. What will you be doing this time tomorrow? What opportunities or challenges will you face? How can we pray for you?

Preaching with a Workplace Emphasis: Steve Graham, pastor in Christchurch, New Zealand, preached a sermon series on Joseph, seeking to understand his daily work circumstances and how they relate to the congregation. He has enjoyed asking some congregants to tell stories from their own lives and interacting with questions about ethical dilemmas.

Work Groups: At Ilam Baptist Church, several home groups decided to take the daily work of their people more seriously. They began by spending the first part of each evening listening to one person’s story of their work history and an explanation of the opportunities and challenges they now face in their work. Where they can, they have decided to visit that person’s workplace. They ask questions and end by praying for that person in their work and for the good of the enterprise and people they work with.

Faith at Work Breakfast: Once a month people gather in a central city venue in Christchurch, New Zealand, for breakfast and an hour of fellowship. A different person each week is invited to share something of their faith and work story. The aim is to keep it honest, down to earth and catch a glimpse of everyday discipleship, rather than focus on more dramatic stories from professional speakers. There is time for questions. Sometimes a case study is presented for discussion.

Workplace Visits: British Baptist Pastor David Coffey says, ‘In my time as a Pastor I made a regular pattern to visit church members in their place of work, whenever this was appropriate. I have sat with the defense lawyer in a court room; I have watched a farmer assist in the birth of a calf; I have spent time with a cancer consultant in his hospital; I have walked the floor of a chemical factory and sat in the office of a manager who runs a large bookshop. I have driven a tank and spent time with some senior military officers; I have shared the tears and joys of family life with homemakers; I have visited a London hostel for the homeless and walked round a regional prison with a Governor. The purpose of such visits is primarily to encourage and disciple a church member in that place where God has called them to be a worker.’

How does your church bridge the gap between Sunday worship and Monday at 9am?

I think many of these ideas are fun and worth a try…but I also wonder if a bigger engagement in the marketplace could be in store for your whole church. Let me know if you’re interested in talking more about what that could look like.

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